Missals from Iram

Liturgical books from a lost city.

Ohio University STARS is seeking models for its 2014 poster campaign

oustars:

image

OU Students Teaching About Racism in Society (OU STARS) is seeking models from different ethnic, cultural, and racial groups to feature in the fourth installment of our “We’re a culture, not a costume” poster campaign. This campaign has gotten national attention each year we have done it; its purpose is to raise awareness about how harmful stereotypes can be perpetuated through Halloween costumes.

If you are interested in modeling for our campaign, please contact us at ohioustars@gmail.com. In the email, please include your name, ethnicity/race, clothing size, a headshot, and what stereotype/costume you wish to see us address in this campaign.

We are especially interested in representing Native American and Romani (“Gypsy”) cultures in this year’s campaign, which we have not had the opportunity to do before.

#43

sparklepetal:

badconlangingideas:

A spoken language in which eyebrow raising and other facial expression chiremes are phonemic.

im sorry, but you could really, seriously argue for facial expressions being moderately phenomic in most natlangs, since “inquisitive” is one that exists? among other things? this is just — what?

Well, that would be more pragmatics, not phonology. It wouldn’t make any sense to say “Put out the fire!” when you’re in a swimming pool, but that doesn’t make location of speech phonemic.

Al-Hakim Mosque, Cairo. Construction on the mosque began in 928 CE and was completed by the Fatimid Caliph Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah ("Ruler by God’s Command"), who reigned from 996 to 1021, when he went on a nighttime journey to the al-Muqattam hills outside of Cairo, and was never seen again.
Called the “Mad Caliph” in Western sources, Al-Hakim is often remembered as a despotic and irrational tyrant who killed his peers and tortured religious minorities on the caprice of his whims. However, among others, especially the Ismaili Shia, he is regarded as a supremely wise and divinely-ordained ruler. Al-Hakim is considered by the Druze to have been the incarnation of god.

Al-Hakim Mosque, Cairo. Construction on the mosque began in 928 CE and was completed by the Fatimid Caliph Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah ("Ruler by God’s Command"), who reigned from 996 to 1021, when he went on a nighttime journey to the al-Muqattam hills outside of Cairo, and was never seen again.

Called the “Mad Caliph” in Western sources, Al-Hakim is often remembered as a despotic and irrational tyrant who killed his peers and tortured religious minorities on the caprice of his whims. However, among others, especially the Ismaili Shia, he is regarded as a supremely wise and divinely-ordained ruler. Al-Hakim is considered by the Druze to have been the incarnation of god.

Toothpaste For Dinner comic: nature fact temperature

Toothpaste For Dinner comic: nature fact temperature

The Infernal Dance of King Kastchei - orchestrated by Isao Tomita, 1975. From the Firebird Suite album.

The Death of Chatterton - Henry Wallis, 1856.

The Death of Chatterton - Henry Wallis, 1856.

visirion:

It’s weird to read people ‘loving the aesthetics of Catholicism” or “longing to be Catholic” it’s just weird? My town is almost entirely Catholic and we associate the church with the authority that keeps us from eating ice cream at midnight on a school night and it’s the first thing that everyone revolts against. In my own head it’s associated almost irreversibly with whiteness as well. It’s for the Church after all that we committed genocide against the Arabs and the Jews and the Native Americans, after all, now wasn’t it? 

I’ve wanted to give Catholicism up for another religion for awhile now and I can’t get the idea out of my head, even though I guess in my heart I don’t think I really can. It’s communal, really, and cultural. When I was an atheist for a good half of my life I was still Catholic. And I suppose that in the depths of my heart I really just want to give up whiteness in hopes that if I do, I could go to heaven in the end. I hate looking in the mirror and seeing nothing but the face of Death look back. 

But you can’t convert to anything out of anger, and I suppose that’s ultimately selfish anyways. Maybe I just have to accept that I’m Amalek and that’s the end of it. 

It’s just bizarre to me why anyone would want to be Catholic. Like the art is pretty and the saint legends are wonderful but we’re nothing but a selfish pack of murderers in the end. 

Obviously this is a really personal issue and I don’t know exactly where you’re coming from on this, but I think I’ve had some similar experiences. I apologize if I step over the line anywhere here.

I was raised Catholic, and around the age of sixteen I decided that I identified as neither Catholic nor Christian. I honestly do understand “loving the aesthetics of Catholicism” and how the idea of a spiritual community could appeal to people. I definitely do admire the aesthetics of Christianity in general, particularly the apostolic traditions. But I decided that I would simply have to find those things elsewhere.

I didn’t see any point in remaining part of a religion that I fundamentally disagreed with. It was a decision I made not out of anger, but after much thought and introspection. If you don’t want to be Catholic, keep in mind that you don’t have to find a specific thing to convert to. You can just deconvert. That’s what I did. And I’m still searching.

Also, I don’t know your ethnic background or anything, but I’m assuming from what you’re writing that you’re white. I don’t want to tell you what to think, but…please, please don’t think like that. When you look in the mirror, you see you. Not the face of death. Whiteness is an arbitrary social construct that we were both born into. We had no control over it, and there’s no point in feeling guilty about it. Guilt won’t take down racism. The actions committed in the name of whiteness do not reflect onto your internal moral character. Only your actions do, and no one else’s.

Also, to state it from a Christian perspective - you don’t need to earn your way into heaven. Whatever you were born as doesn’t matter - even being part of the most odious social structure can’t block your way to salvation. Salvation if a gift freely offered by Christ, with no conditions.

Colored ink on paper by Rabindranath Tagore, c. 1931-32.

Colored ink on paper by Rabindranath Tagore, c. 1931-32.