Missals from Iram

Liturgical books from a lost city.
archaicwonder:

Stephanophoric type tetradrachm from Lebedos, Ionia by Pyrtanis the magistrate, c. 160-140 BC
This coin shows the head of Athena facing to right, wearing a crested Attic helmet. On the reverse is ΛEBEΔIΩN with an owl standing facing on a club, between two cornucopiae, ΠPYT-ANIΣ below, all within a wreath.
Lebedos was one of the twelve cities of the Ionian League and was located on and around the modern Kısık Peninsula in Turkey. According to Pausanias, the town was inhabited by Carians when the Ionian Greeks immigrated there under the guidance of Andræmon, a son of Codrus. Strabo, however, states that it was colonized by Andropompus and that it previously bore the name of Artis in Lydia. Lebedos became a flourishing city thanks to its commerce, and was famous for its mineral springs. But it was one of the smaller cities of the Ionian League, handicapped by the limited space of its hinterland and a comparatively unsuitable port.
In the Hellenistic age, around 304 BC, Antigonus I Monophthalmus tried to join the city with Teos; however, this operation was incomplete and eventually annulled by Lysimachus, who moved its population to Ephesus in 292 BC.
Under Roman rule, it flourished anew, becoming the meeting place of the actors of all Ionia when these were temporarily exiled from Teos, and festivals were celebrated in honour of Dionysus.
Lebedos’ scanty remains are near the modern town of Seferihisar.

archaicwonder:

Stephanophoric type tetradrachm from Lebedos, Ionia by Pyrtanis the magistrate, c. 160-140 BC

This coin shows the head of Athena facing to right, wearing a crested Attic helmet. On the reverse is ΛEBEΔIΩN with an owl standing facing on a club, between two cornucopiae, ΠPYT-ANIΣ below, all within a wreath.

Lebedos was one of the twelve cities of the Ionian League and was located on and around the modern Kısık Peninsula in Turkey. According to Pausanias, the town was inhabited by Carians when the Ionian Greeks immigrated there under the guidance of Andræmon, a son of Codrus. Strabo, however, states that it was colonized by Andropompus and that it previously bore the name of Artis in Lydia. Lebedos became a flourishing city thanks to its commerce, and was famous for its mineral springs. But it was one of the smaller cities of the Ionian League, handicapped by the limited space of its hinterland and a comparatively unsuitable port.

In the Hellenistic age, around 304 BC, Antigonus I Monophthalmus tried to join the city with Teos; however, this operation was incomplete and eventually annulled by Lysimachus, who moved its population to Ephesus in 292 BC.

Under Roman rule, it flourished anew, becoming the meeting place of the actors of all Ionia when these were temporarily exiled from Teos, and festivals were celebrated in honour of Dionysus.

Lebedos’ scanty remains are near the modern town of Seferihisar.

(Source: baldwin.co.uk, via of-the-ages)

theancientworld:

Bracelets, Lapis Lazuli and gold, 940 BCE, 22nd Dynasty Ancient Egypt

"Gold cuff bracelet of Prince Nemareth: the inner side of the smaller segment of this bracelet is inscribed for a man with the Libyan name of Nimlot (also rendered as Nemareth or the like). The external decoration of the bracelet consists of geometric decoration and a figure of a child god. The god is represented in a typical ancient Egyptian manner for a male child: nude, wearing a long sidelock of hair and with a finger to the mouth. That this is not a mere human child, however, is indicated by his crook-shaped scepter of rule, the uraeus on his forehead, and his headdress, which is a lunar crescent and disk. The deity depicted on these bracelets is most probably Harpocrates. Two uraei guard the lunar symbols. Presumably, they represent the protective goddesses of Upper and Lower Egypt, which the Egyptians often equated with the ordered universe. And the blue lotus, on several of which the deity squats, is a symbol of creation from the primordial ocean, from which the sun first rose, and of birth and rebirth, presumably because that flower rises above the water when it opens each dawn. The bracelet was once inlaid with lapis lazuli."

The British Museum

Source

(via leradr)

*wanders the earth for 700 years in search of someone who can shave just a couple seconds more off a rendition of Ravel’s Toccata*

centuriespast:

Stonehenge, 2 May 1816
by Francis Etheridge
Date painted: 1816
Oil on board, 25.5 x 32 cm
Collection: Wiltshire Museum
Inscribed on reverse: ‘South west view of the Druidical. Temple of Stonehenge on Stonehenge Plain, from the Great Stone called the Friar’s Heel.

centuriespast:

Stonehenge, 2 May 1816

by Francis Etheridge

Date painted: 1816

Oil on board, 25.5 x 32 cm

Collection: Wiltshire Museum

Inscribed on reverse: ‘South west view of the Druidical. Temple of Stonehenge on Stonehenge Plain, from the Great Stone called the Friar’s Heel.

(via leradr)

animus-inviolabilis:

Terracotta fragment of a votive relief depicting Hades abducting Persephone
Greek
470–460 B.C.

animus-inviolabilis:

Terracotta fragment of a votive relief depicting Hades abducting Persephone

Greek

470–460 B.C.

(via leradr)

archaicwonder:

Elamite Dog Amulet of the goddess Gula, Circa 3rd Millennium BC
In ancient Elam, the significance of the dog was related to the goddess Gula, since they were her sacred animals. As the goddess of healing and patroness of doctors, these gold amuletic dogs may have been thought to have healing powers. Gula’s principle shrine was at the é-u-gi7-ra (“Dog Temple”) at Isin, but she also had temples at Nippur, Borsippa, and Assur. Particularly notable in Isin are more than 30 dog burials discovered below the ramp leading to the temple. 
Elam was an ancient civilization centered in the far west and southwest of modern-day Iran, stretching from the lowlands of what is now Khuzestan and Ilam Province, as well as a small part of southern Iraq. In classical literature, Elam was more often referred to as Susiana, a name derived from its capital, Susa.

archaicwonder:

Elamite Dog Amulet of the goddess Gula, Circa 3rd Millennium BC

In ancient Elam, the significance of the dog was related to the goddess Gula, since they were her sacred animals. As the goddess of healing and patroness of doctors, these gold amuletic dogs may have been thought to have healing powers. Gula’s principle shrine was at the é-u-gi7-ra (“Dog Temple”) at Isin, but she also had temples at Nippur, Borsippa, and Assur. Particularly notable in Isin are more than 30 dog burials discovered below the ramp leading to the temple. 

Elam was an ancient civilization centered in the far west and southwest of modern-day Iran, stretching from the lowlands of what is now Khuzestan and Ilam Province, as well as a small part of southern Iraq. In classical literature, Elam was more often referred to as Susiana, a name derived from its capital, Susa.

(via leradr)