Missals from Iram

Liturgical books from a lost city.

(Source: dazeyearsmonths)

massarrah:

Old Akkadian Administrative Text on Gypsum

This beautifully preserved administrative text from Nippur is recorded in Old Akkadian on a gypsum tablet. As the official language of records during the reigns of Sargon (c. 2334-2279) and his successors, Old Akkadian was used in administrative records such as the one above. It was also used in letters, and a few examples of literature in this early form of Akkadian have survived.

Sargon of Akkad is well-known for later legends about his origins, which chronicle how, having been abandoned, he was found floating on the Euphrates River in a basket made of reeds. His name in Akkadian, Šarru-kīnu, is a throne name meaning “The true (kīnu) king (šarru)”. (Sources 1, 2)

Old Akkadian, c. 2340-2200 BCE. 

University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Photo from CDLI.

(via ancient-mesopotamia)

deepstarss:

"you’re not asian! you’re indian/pakistani/bengali/other"

bruh does the asian map look like this to you:

image

It’s a dialectal difference. Geography be damned, “Asian” never refers to someone from south, central, or west Asia in American English. In common parlance, anyways. Just as British people apparently call east and southeast Asians “Oriental” but south Asians “Asian”.

(via kanpeteshuniami)

hismarmorealcalm:

Colossi of Memnon  Site of Temple of Amenhotep III  New Kingdom - Dynasty XVIII  Theban Plain   West Thebes  Photograph by Edition Photoglob

hismarmorealcalm:

Colossi of Memnon  Site of Temple of Amenhotep III  New Kingdom - Dynasty XVIII  Theban Plain   West Thebes  Photograph by Edition Photoglob

ancientpeoples:

Faience aryballos 
Shaped like to fish and designed to contain oil. 5.7 cm high and 11.1 cm wide. 
Greek, Archaic Period, 6th century BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

"Agathe! Look at what I found half-price at the potter’s stand today!"
"Why would you spend money on this stupid kitschy piece of shit, Diogenes. Why. Get this out of our house now"

ancientpeoples:

Faience aryballos 

Shaped like to fish and designed to contain oil. 5.7 cm high and 11.1 cm wide. 

Greek, Archaic Period, 6th century BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

"Agathe! Look at what I found half-price at the potter’s stand today!"

"Why would you spend money on this stupid kitschy piece of shit, Diogenes. Why. Get this out of our house now"

(via of-the-ages)

Idea that’s been floating around in my head this busy week: Developing the languages (as well as details of the society) found on the island shared by the mythical humanoids of the Hippopodes, Oeonae, and Panotti, as described by Pliny the Elder in the Natural History. I used the same fantasy setting for a very mediocre short story I wrote in high school.