Missals from Iram

Liturgical books from a lost city.

artofthedarkages:

Brass processional crosses (circa. 1100s-1400s) made to be held by monks and priests in ecclesiastical ceremonies.

All of them found at different monasteries in Ethiopia and currently on view at the Walters Museum in Baltimore.

Notice the details- are those animals? people? biblical allusions perhaps? 

Notice how the structure and intricate designs on each cross both differ and are alike- maybe there is more to the interlace and shapes than one may expect.

hellenismo:

"Doves watering" - mosaic from the House of the Doves at Pompeii

hellenismo:

"Doves watering" - mosaic from the House of the Doves at Pompeii

(via leradr)

If I don’t pass the exemption exam this Saturday and get out of my junior comp class, I am going to cry.

artofthedarkages:

These are two illuminated gospel books were made between 300-700 AD at Abba Garima Monastery in Ethiopia.

The Garima Gospels contain twenty eight full-page illuminations; each one bursting with color. The remarkably extant book covers are decorated with gold, silver, and holes where gems had been placed.

According to the oral history of the monastery, the manuscripts were scribed and illustrated by Abba Garima himself in the 490s AD. Thus, the Garima Gospels were acknowledged by the monks as being extremely old and religiously valuable.

The handful of Western scholars who managed to venture to Abba Garima Monastery upon their inspection of the manuscripts suspected some Mediterranean influence, but concluded that the illuminations were within a firmly conventional and uninteresting style of 12th-14th century Ethiopian painting.

It was not until 2000, when the French scholar Jaques Mercier brought fragments of the manuscripts’ parchment to Oxford University for radiocarbon dating, that the Garima Gospels were pushed into the international spotlight as one of the oldest (and most well preserved) illuminated gospel books.

Now, the Garima Gospels are considered one of the artistic wonders of the world: a priceless treasure from the ancient world preserved in the most unlikely of places.

The difficulty of actually seeing these extraordinary manuscripts—many of them are hoarded away in the mountain monasteries of Ethiopia—has kept the art historical community from bringing to light what could be a vast and beautiful strain of Late Antique painted religious books.

Additionally, it was not until scholars found a possible connection that the manuscripts shared with the “Western tradition” that they decided it was worthy of actually being looked at!

The Garima Gospels are both heartening and frustrating in this regard…

(via of-the-ages)

west-slavs:

Medieval chess set found in Sandomierz, Poland.

Culture: Slavic (West Slavs - early Polish state / Piast dynasty).

Timeline: end of 11th century / beginning of 12th century

[source]

Two almost complete sets (with only four pieces missing) have been excavated in 1972 in Sandomierz, Poland. This stunning discovery has been housed in  District Museum in Sandomierz since 1980 and is one of its most valuable archaeological exhibits.

The pieces are from end of the 11th century to the beginning of the 12th century and are made of deer horn. They were most likely brought to Poland from Middle East during the Crusades. [x]

Apart from Sandomierz, approximately 30 chess figures have been found in the area of Medieval Poland. They come from Wroclaw, Gniezno, Kruszwica and Warsaw - the are dated between the end of the 11th and the 15th centuries. [x]

(via leradr)

Portrait of Shah Ismail I of Iran (b. 1487 r. 1501-1524) - unknown Venetian artist, c. early 17th century. Uffizi Gallery, Florence.
A pivotal figure in the history of the Islamic world, Ismail I founded the Safavid dynasty and initiated the conversion of Iran to Twelver Shia Islam. Ismail’s father, Shaykh Haydar, was the head of the militant and extremist heterodox Shia Safaviyya order, and claimed to be a descendant of Ali.
In 1488, Ismail’s father died in battle against the forces of the Shirvanshah. When Ismail was just seven, in 1494, he inherited the leadership of the Safaviyya when his older brother was killed by the Ak Koyunlu sultan, and was forced to go into hiding.
At the age of 13, in 1500, Ismail came out of hiding, gathered his supporters, and avenged his father, attacking, defeating, and killing the Shirvanshah, Farrukh Yassar, and most of his nobility. Thus began an enormous and rapid sweep of conquest through the region that fulfilled messianic expectations; Ismail declared himself the Mahdi and a reincarnation of Ali. By the age of 23 in 1510, he had conquered all of Iran.
Ismail imposed Shiism as the mandatory religion for the entire nation, forcibly converting Sunnis, demolishing Sunni mosques, destroying the tombs of the Abbasid Caliphs, and instating the ritual and compulsory cursing of the first three Sunni Caliphs as usurpers. Despite these extreme policies, he ended up promoting normative Twelver Shiism, rather than the messianic heterodox Shiism of the Safaviyya.

Portrait of Shah Ismail I of Iran (b. 1487 r. 1501-1524) - unknown Venetian artist, c. early 17th century. Uffizi Gallery, Florence.

A pivotal figure in the history of the Islamic world, Ismail I founded the Safavid dynasty and initiated the conversion of Iran to Twelver Shia Islam. Ismail’s father, Shaykh Haydar, was the head of the militant and extremist heterodox Shia Safaviyya order, and claimed to be a descendant of Ali.

In 1488, Ismail’s father died in battle against the forces of the Shirvanshah. When Ismail was just seven, in 1494, he inherited the leadership of the Safaviyya when his older brother was killed by the Ak Koyunlu sultan, and was forced to go into hiding.

At the age of 13, in 1500, Ismail came out of hiding, gathered his supporters, and avenged his father, attacking, defeating, and killing the Shirvanshah, Farrukh Yassar, and most of his nobility. Thus began an enormous and rapid sweep of conquest through the region that fulfilled messianic expectations; Ismail declared himself the Mahdi and a reincarnation of Ali. By the age of 23 in 1510, he had conquered all of Iran.

Ismail imposed Shiism as the mandatory religion for the entire nation, forcibly converting Sunnis, demolishing Sunni mosques, destroying the tombs of the Abbasid Caliphs, and instating the ritual and compulsory cursing of the first three Sunni Caliphs as usurpers. Despite these extreme policies, he ended up promoting normative Twelver Shiism, rather than the messianic heterodox Shiism of the Safaviyya.

#20

badconlangingideas:

Make a derivational affix, consisting of a single letter, which when applied to a noun turns it into “have sex with the noun”.

And an unvoiced schwa, at that. Or a glottal stop.

ancientart:

A selection of Early Cycladic II ‘frying pans’ from the cemetery of Chalandriani, Syros. All date to about 2800-2300 BCE.

The 1st ‘frying pan’ shows an incised representation of a paddled longboat set among stamped wave-like spirals. The 2nd, stamped wave-like spirals, the 3rd, impressed and incised wave-like spirals, and the 4th, a solar(?) decoration: incised circle and triangular motifs. The lower areas of each of the artifacts are thought to represent a female pubic triangle.

Courtesy & currently located at the National Archaeological Museum, Athens. Photos taken by Dan Diffendale.

(via leradr)